Control of the Norwegian mouse, its characteristics, harms and how to distinguish it from other species
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Control of the Norwegian mouse, its characteristics, harms and how to distinguish it from other species

The Norwegian mouse, its characteristics, harms, and how to distinguish it from other species The norwegian rat (the norwegian rat) is commonly known as the street or sewer rat (thought to be of Asian origin). These rodents appeared in the United States in the eighteenth century, where they were reached by ships from other countries, and the Norwegian rats are found all over the world today. Norwegian mice are color-blind and have poor vision, although their other senses such as hearing, smell, touch and taste are well-functioning. They are able to run, climb, jump and swim but they are not very agile and these mice damage property and buildings by gnawing. The external appearance of the Norwegian rat Norway rats have coarse brown fur, with black hairs scattered throughout their fur and the underside tending to be lighter. They have small eyes and ears and their tails are shorter than the length of the head and body next to each other and they have a grayish-white belly and their bodies are long with a heavy build. Adults can reach between 10-12 inches in length including the tail and both tails and ears without hair. Where do Norwegian rats live? They can live in underground burrows near water sources and are likely to be found around building walls, under rubbish and wood piles, around gardens, river banks, in fields or behind walls. Norway rats prefer to live in fields, farmland, buildings and burrow under concrete slabs. When food and water supplies are low, Norway rats usually go home in the fall. Norway rats often nest as soon as they enter a building in basements or piles of debris or quiet material in basements. While Norway rats tend to live in low places and basements, they can sometimes live on roofs. What do Norwegian rats eat? Norway rats are omnivores that eat animal and plant matter. Norwegian rats consume a wide range of foods from soap to candy, milk, meat, vegetables, fish, eggs, all grains, nuts and fruits. They can also eat very large amounts and in one day can eat a third of their weight in food. They are also capable of catching fish, small rodents, and dead animals. In towns, Norway rats enjoy unconsumed or spoiled human food. periods of activity of the norwegian rat They are mainly nocturnal or active at dusk and leave their homes as night approaches. Norway rats move on land but can also swim and climb, and they are also called "water rats". They usually live together in large groups with the largest male being the leader and the male getting food, water and shelter first. Norway rats dig burrows, forage for food, and prepare nests in areas near water. Foraging behaviors can take mice on long night trips to areas known to be rich in food resources. It has great learning abilities as it is able to remember its way through intricate networks of sewers and burrows. The damage caused by the Norwegian mouse Norway rats can damage property and buildings due to their tendency to bite just about anything making them a threat to homeowners. Norwegian rats are carriers of serious diseases including jaundice, rat bite fever, cowpox virus, trichinosis and salmonellosis. They consume stored food and transmit diseases via droppings, faeces, bites, fleas and mites in their fur. It has caused more casualties than all wars in history. In the past 1,000 years, it is estimated that rat-borne diseases have killed more people than all wars and revolutions that have ever occurred. They also carry lice and fleas, which are the cause of bubonic plague, typhus, tularemia, trichinosis and bacterial jaundice. These pests also cause other major damages such as loss and contamination of stored human food and damage to buildings from the inside and outside. It is estimated that rats cause about $1 billion in damage to the United States each year. Rats kill poultry, domestic animals and game birds and are responsible for endangering or endangering many species of wild animals, especially those on the islands. How do I know the Norwegian mouse from other species? Due to their ability to adapt to the human environment there are only three species of rats and mice that are by far the most common and important rodent in homes and businesses around the world. There is the brown rat (Rattus norvegicus) also called the common rat or Norway rat, the ship rat (Rattus rattus also known as the roof rat or black rat) and the house mouse (Mus domesticus). With a length of 3-10 cm, the small size of the house mouse is the easiest characteristic to distinguish. A mature mouse can be distinguished from a young rat by its larger ears and longer tail compared to its body length than that of a rat. The young rat also has significantly larger feet and head on the body than a mouse. Mice are usually light gray or brown with a lighter shade on their stomachs. The brown rat is larger than the black rat and has different characteristics: • Thicker body. • The tail is shorter than the length (head + body). • Pale color under the tail. • Small hairy ears. • A sharp nose. black rat: • Slim body. • Large thin ears. • A pointed nose. • The tail is longer than the length (head + body). What are the companies responsible for controlling Norwegian mice in Kuwait? The best of these companies: • The Norwegian Rat Control Company, Hawalli. • The Norwegian Ahmadi Rat Control Company. • As well as the Norwegian company to combat mice, Abdullah Al-Mubarak. • The Norwegian Rat Control Company, Salmiya. • Anti-class company

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